OCA Thames Valley Group Meeting on 15th July 2017

Attached is a PDF of the notes I made for the OCASA website as they again provided funds for tutor Jayne Taylor to join us.

Notes for OCASA on 15th July 2017 OCA Thames Valley Group Meeting

I showed the group a selection from the Cyanotypes I created at the recent Workshop I attended (see here   ) and some further experiments using old glass negatives.

The glass negatives are fascinating to work with (I’ll be unpacking some more later today) and I am continuing to upload my ongoing experiments to my Instagram account . In addition to thinking about how I can ‘present’ these variously sized pieces of work I am also thinking whether I can use  cyanotypes of enlarged extracts from my father’s letters from Egypt as development of Assignment 2.

 

They haven’t exposed as clearly as I would have wanted but, as John said, the other cyanotypes I am creating can be regarded as practice models and some of them are very clear.  Both he and Jayne were also interested in the small negatives I had created to use

and thought it would be good to find ways of utilising them as items in themselves.

My brain is still circling around topics to use for the critical review (Assignment 3) but keeps leaping ahead as well to Assignment 4/5 so Jayne suggested I create a mind-map. I have used them in the past but need to guard against being distracted into spending too much time making sure that the map itself has ‘correct’ links.

I also mentioned my idea for a project which will take me back onto the Copse and my intention to use wool to create work in the landscape itself. I’ve already started on this and tagged it on Instagram first as #weftwood, but then decided that #interruptedlandscape would be good as an overarching title for this kind of work. Here’s a taster video I created when I first began

<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/226924929″>In the Beginning</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/cblearninglog”>Catherine Banks</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

The project will build fairly slowly according to weather conditions and I’ll be writing more fully about in a later post.

Workshop : An Introduction to Cyanotypes

Workshop with Russell Squires at Aspex Gallery, Portsmouth

Russell Squires   is a photographer, based in Portsmouth, who uses both traditional and digital processes in his fine art practice.  He is an OCA tutor in addition to teaching at other Institutions. The Workshop was held at the Aspex Gallery  https://aspex.org.uk  – a contemporary art gallery which is in a slightly hidden-away corner of Gunwharf Quays – a designer shopping outlet set in the re-developed historic waterfront of Portsmouth.  It’s a pleasant environment, especially on a lovely Summer’s day.

Russell had asked us to send him two jpegs beforehand so that he could convert them into digital negatives ready to use for cyanotypes (in fact he’d prepared two of each and explained to us that this gives a better contrast and structure) and had also prepared a set of treated paper to use (necessary given the relatively short amount of time we had). These were handed to us together with a proof contact frame to hold the prepared paper and objects/digital negatives.  Russell then quickly took us through aspects such as useful accessories; the formula/recipe for the cyanotype solution, how hydrogen peroxide can be used in one of the rinses after the print has been exposed (creates a deeper blue), the best type of brush for painting the solution on the paper (no metal parts),  and the type of paper that he uses ( Goldline Watercolour 200gsm )

We were shown how to weigh and prepare the solution (NB use de-ionised or mineral water to mix and a wooden stick – nothing metal) and then each of us prepared one sheet of paper ourselves which was then placed to dry, in a closed cardboard box to keep it in darkness,  ready to take home at the end of the day.  Next was to set up our first print, using a variety of objects and materials, place in the contact frame and then under a UV tube rather than out in sunlight.  Whilst waiting for the exposure to take, Russell told us some of the history of the Cyanotype process (John Herschel’s invention, Anna Atkins’s botanic prints) and how cyanotype prints came to be used for ‘blueprints’ and later family portraits because they were so cheap to make. Russell also showed us some of his own cyanotype  which varied from various kinds of blueprints  as here to cyanotype prints over-sewn with red thread. He also gave us names of some other contemporary artists who use the process in various ways including Stephen Turner who currently has an Exhibition of his work in the Gallery (see further information below).

Two prints were created using object/materials and then another using a digital negative.

 

2. After peroxide rinse

 

I enjoyed watching the prints emerge complete – through one water rinse, another rinse with water plus a couple of drops of hydrogen peroxide, further clean water rinse and then hung to dry out.  We prepared a further print but there was insufficient time to rinse it out. This proved to be my one ‘failure’ because I left it over a day to rinse out and it came out very pale.  I actually quite liked the paleness, but have begun to colour it in using Marshalls oil pencils for a different effect.

 

Some Contemporary Artists who use Cyanotype Process

Walead Beshty

Best known for his work in photography but he also uses many other media in his artistic process such as travelling with unexposed transparency film in his luggage and thus expxosing it to airport x-ray scannersHe has also exposed colour photographic paper to coloured light from a horizontal enlarger and processed this with a large-format colour processor, see here

A year of artistic process captured through cyanotypes

<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/108348294″>Walead Beshty in The Curve</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/barbicancentre”>Barbican Centre</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

Annie Lopez has made dresses from old patterns using material that has been printed using the cyanotype process

Rosie Emerson  mainly works on representing the female form. She creates screen prints using unusual materials and has also created hand finished prints using cyanotypes and acrylic paint see here

Stephen Turner

Turner’s multi-media work focuses on changes between human-made and natural environments. His most recent Project has been The Exbury Egg   a collaborative with Space Place & Urban Design (SPUD) and PAD Studio architects. He worked with the designers to create the Egg  which he used as a self-sustaining work space . It’s a fascinating construction, as you can see if you follow the link, and Turner used it to study the life of a tidal creek and create artwork in response.

I missed seeing The Egg itself when it was installed at Gunwharf Quays but, fortunately, there is an ongoing Exhibition Everything Comes from the Egg   at the Aspex Gallery( from June to 3rd September).  I was able to visit during lunchtime and found it fascinating.  There are many cyanotypes which he created using different materials ,such as discarded packaging, as a base plus  architectural drawings; small egg-shaped sculptures and glass jars filled with local flora.  I found it all very inspiring.

 

Interim thoughts

This was a thoroughly enjoyable workshop for me and I was surprised how quickly the time went by.  The Gallery was a lovely space to be in and Russell had created an excellent structure for the day – entwining creative work with information, practical skills and discussions.  I felt good to come away with completed creative work, think I now have a good grasp of how to create Cyanotype prints and am already thinking of  ways I can use them in my coursework.

 

References

http://russellsquires.co.uk/about/
https://aspex.org.uk
https://aspex.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/everything-comes-from-the-egg/
https://exburyegg.me
https://www.artsy.net/artist/walead-beshty
http://www.phxart.org/exhibition/annielopez
http://www.rosieemerson.co.uk/about.html
http://www.rosieemerson.co.uk/portfolio.html
http://www.spudgroup.org.uk/exbury-egg
http://www.stephenturner.org.uk
https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/spacemonkeypress?ref=l2-shop-info-name

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Cyanotype Process: Sun Prints

Two of my OCA student colleagues had recently uploaded Prussian blue solar prints to Instagram and I loved the deep blue colour so I decided to have a go myself using 4”x4” Sunprint paper.  Other companies make this type of paper as well so there’s plenty of choice on the internet. Technical descriptions of the process  completely miss the excitement of waiting for an exposure to be created – the timing, checking, slowly watching the blue paper turn white and then, after rinsing, see it all turn blue again and the image emerging more clearly (or not!) once the print has dried.


<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/222532387″>'''Twas on a Wednesday morning …..</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/cblearninglog”>Catherine Banks</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

My first experiment was to layer some leaves on the paper.

The look of it appealed to me but I thought the process could work better if items placed have clearer outlines so I decided to create a digital contact sheet of some pressed poppies I had photographed

 

There are two versions, the first exposure was pale and there was a leach of colour for some reason. During second exposure I had moved the negative slightly when I was checking it and there is a ‘double’ effect which I think is more interesting. I had bought some wooden cut-outs of butterflies so I tried those next and then decided to add to them so I layered some flower heads on top of the sun-print. By serendipity there were two tiny greenflies I hadn’t noticed when I re-photographed and these can be seen.

 

I had photographed my hotel bedroom whilst staying in Bath so decided to create digital contact negatives from the images and see how these turned out. A good result.

 

I uploaded jpegs of some of the prints to my Instagram account which, of course, meant I had to scan/re-photograph.  What was interesting was the difference between the scan and photograph as the photograph retained the slightly crumpled look of the original sun-print but the scan image was flat. You can see the differences above.  I also prepared a contact sheet as I wanted to print on some washi bamboo paper (which I thought would suit the colour of the sun prints) and then take to show members of OCA Thames Valley Group. The contact sheet also shows the differences as seen below.

 

What next? Well I have some ideas in relation to Assignment 2 and my dad’s letters and have already begun experimenting. I am also booked into a Cyanotype Workshop on the 2nd July down in Portsmouth with Russell Squires who is an OCA tutor and was also my tutor for Context & Narrative so it’ll be good to see him. In the meantime, below is a little more information on the cyanotype process.

The Cyanotype Process

This process was invented by Sir John Herschel in June 1842, for contact-printing photographic images on paper in Prussian Blue see here  .  Anna Atkins, considered to be the first female photographer , quickly used the process to create photograms of botanical specimens and, with her friend Anne Dixon, hand-printed several cyanotype albums. Coincidentally, as I began to write this blogpost, John sent me a link to an article about Anna Atkins  in the online Guardian  However, the cyanotype process only came into wider use after Herschel’s death in 1871 when a French company (Marion et Cie) marketed a cyanotype paper mainly for plan-copying and it was from this that the word blueprint came to be used.

You can prepare your own light-sensitive cyanotype paper by treating it first with a solution of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate or buy paper (or fabric) which has been pre-treated and then place natural objects or photographic negatives to contact print using some form of daylight – natural or artificial. When the treated paper is exposed in this way the light reacts with the solution on the paper and causes a pigment Prussian Blue to form. When the exposure is correct the paper is rinsed to wash the unreacted iron away, then, as the paper dries, the Prussian Blue colour is revealed. I should add that treated paper can now be in different colours – green, yellow, violet. Also the resulting prints can be dyed with liquid such as tea.

 

References

http://www.sunprints.org
http://www.luminous-lint.com/app/vexhibit/_PROCESS_Cyanotype_01/2/0/0
https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/jun/23/blooming-marvellous-the-worlds-first-female-photographer-and-her-botanical-beauties

 

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

1. Spring on the Copse April 2017

 

 

 

Spring eventually arrived on the Copse after some very wet and muddy weather. I uploaded the above video slideshow, created on Photoshop, onto my Facebook feed – images taken with my Canon DSLR with ambient sound (from my iPhone) added.

Feedback was that the images needed to stay on the screen a little longer, so I extended the timing and, as I wasn’t sure about the black background, changed it to a white one which I think worked better.

 

Feedback on that related to the slightly different sizes of the images, so I re-worked those to produce Version 3

 

Towards the end of the month I created another one purely with my iPhone and recording the sounds I heard at the time which I processed in iMovie.

 

 

It was quite an eerie feeling, hearing the music.

There doesn’t seem to be much difference in quality between Phosohop and iMovie processing so far but I have now downloaded Adobe Premiere Pro so will be experimenting with that at some point.  I’ve been uploading processed videos to both YouTube and Vimeo and have decided that Vimeo has better quality.

 

 

 

 

Holga Images

OCA Thames Valley Group Body of Work Project is ongoing (I first referred to it here)  . The submission date isn’t until February 2018 but knowing my tendency to procrastinate until the last minute, I decided to start playing around with some ideas. I’ve used Holga lenses during previous Modules so decided to experiment to see whether I could achieve a timeless effect that evoked narrative.

 Now I’ve uploaded them I need to let the effect settle until I decide a possible route.

Bath Spa University Graduate Show : June 2017

I travelled to Bath for a meet-up with Anna and after a catch-up on progress on our individual OCA work, we went along to the Graduate Show of Bath School of Art and Design. A busy day as this was also an Open Day for prospective students. Oh to be young again with the world at my feet!

There was a huge variety of work to view, scattered over the site, and here’s a selection from those I found particularly interesting.

 

After talking with Susannah Lemon – a Three Dimensional Designer –  about the sculptural lamp she had created from an old bicycle chain, I was attracted towards a table of ‘artefacts’ and other objects  created by Joshua Roughly another student of Three Dimensional Design.

He focused on “…. The creation , curation and study of objects and spaces that tell stories through a conceptual narrative attachment”, and his Design Studio is named Sögumaður   –  the place where stories are made.  The table/display contained his project based on Cryptogeology “the pseudoscientific study of geological formations that feature physical, chemical or historical references that are able to prove or suggest the potential existence of creatures that have a disputed or unsubstantiated actuality”- creatures such as trolls, objects and structures – to be touched and viewed and wondered about.

 

Juan Fontcuberta’s name doesn’t seem to be mentioned but, to me,  Joshuas’s work seems in the same spirit and I enjoyed its whimsical and imaginative nature. He even has an Etsy shop where he sells textile taxidermy

Josephine Frayling

In her Traditional and Digital Paintings and sketches Josephine explores classical figurative painting from a contemporary stance including using symbolic imagery from nature. The use of colour and the direct gaze really drew me here and I could almost imagine her subject stepping out of the frame.

Elizabeth Horridge

The above is a detail from a very large ‘installation’ strung along a wide area. Elizabeth’s work relates to the body – the concept of ‘fat rolls’ and body image – including  sculptural installations(as this one)  using  various types of materials such as latex, chains, woods, butchers’ hooks and bin bags. This is a visceral project that certainly almost hit me in the eyes and made me walk closer to look. Elizabeth was also involved in a Facebook Project “The Postal Art Project” that involved responding to a second-hand postcard – the outcome to be a collaborative zine. Interesting description of her approach to it  here 

Maria Kay

 

Delicate drawings in a concertina book  from Maria who is a Contemporary Arts graduate, printmaker and bookbinding enthusiast who handwrites her blog posts.

Photographers

Some of the ones we looked at appeared in Source Graduate Photography Online  and it was from there that I was able to obtain links to websites.

Steve Edwards

 

Tempus Fugit a series of still life images, photographed in Dutch Vanitas style, “ ….illustrating the accelerating rate of the consumption of consumer goods and thus the associated resources”.  He also showed his series In Step – a study of discarded shoes.

The Tempus Fugit images were most professional and well-presented and the discarded shoes series has a quirky personality all their own. Steve’s comprehensive Professional Contexts 3 academic blog makes interesting reading as well.

Charlotte Elkins

 

I am becoming increasingly interested in alternative methods and so was drawn towards Charlotte’s delicate images conveying her fascination with water.  The images were produced through the use of photo etching which is something I know nothing about and my internet searches produced little information.

Aleksandra Kondracka

Aleksandra came to England from Poland at the age of eleven and the series Rodzinka focuses on ideas of identity and belonging following a period of reconnection with Poland and spending time with members of her family.  Her entry in Source Online focuses instead on landscape and the woodlands that enabled her to build a sense of place when she came to England.

Alena Nicholson

Alena comes from Chicago and the series I viewed explores how she became accustomed to living in Bath and came to terms with being homesick. She makes an interesting use of handwritten text on her display panels

Further Thoughts

It could have been because I interacted with them last but the photography work I saw, whilst interesting, didn’t impact me as much as the more three dimensional work I saw first. I was very aware of how ‘flat’ photographs can seem when viewed on a wall. Maybe this is why I find photo books so interesting because they are more tactile and am attracted towards the layering of images and alternatives methods. I felt relieved that Anna had a similar experience as she describes here

 References

http://artdesign.bathspa.ac.uk/news/degree-show-2017-save-the-date/
http://clockworkimaging.co.uk
http://www.clarekrige.co.uk/current-work
http://elizabethhorridge1.wixsite.com/artist
http://elizabethhorridge1.wixsite.com/artist/postal-art-project
https://www.etsy.com/shop/sogumadur
https://www.jonhardsdottir.com/portfolio
http://www.josephinefrayling.com
http://www.pinningdownclouds.com
http://www.pinningdownclouds.com/works.html
https://sogumadur.com
https://sogumadur.com/portfolio/cryptogeology/
https://www.thealenanicholson.com/about/

 

OCA Thames Valley Group Meeting on 20th May 2017

Twelve of us met at the Phoenix Centre with tutor Jayne Taylor and we had a busy day, as usual, with a full agenda. I am attaching here the PDF of a report on the meeting which I prepared for inclusion on the OCASA website.

Notes for OCASA re OCA TV Group Meeting 20th May 2017

Here are the photographs of the day in a better resolution than on the PDF.

I realise that I’m never in any of the photographs of the day because I’m the one taking the photographs so must make sure someone else takes the photographs next time.

My thoughts on the day

I’m a member of the Body of Work Project sub-group, so I enjoyed the discussion after Teresa gave a summary of progress so far. The Long Kiln Gallery at the Maltings seems very spacious with its high ceiling and it was a shame that, due to class taking place, we weren’t able to take a photograph of the gallery to show the rest of the group.

It always refreshes me to see the variety of work being created by other members – inspiring as well. I’m still at a ‘stuck’ phase in relation to coursework for the Digital Image & Culture Module but I did feel better when I related the other photography connected work I’d been involved with – two short videos; photographs created using a Holga lens; first experiments with colourising 1940s black and white photographs; joining Instagram,  and preparing for two of my poppy photographs to be in a local exhibition.  I will write separate blog posts as a fuller record of these.

Thanks as ever to Jayne Taylor for her valuable input and to OCASA for the funding.